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  • home : How to Annoy a Millennial

    How to Annoy a Millennial

    HOLY SHIT THE PHONE IS RINGING OMG OMG OMG

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    28 comments

    1. Alex says:

      Just reading this made me deeply uncomfortable.

    2. John says:

      I’m a gen-x’er, my wife a gen-y. How accurate this truly is.

    3. smalljones says:

      Step 4: Send an email message asking “Did you get my voice mail?” Annoyance level = head explosion

    4. Oh … so, I’m annoying now? Fine, I’ll stop calling!

    5. Nickle says:

      This is true about anyone who is entrenched in technology. Perhaps it’s just more common among the Millennials.

    6. Justin ST says:

      People won’t understand how to respond to a cellphone call if they’re in Gen Y? Excuse me? What a stupid article. I have no idea who this applies to. I think it’s more rude to send someone you don’t know well a text message instead of calling them. I have no idea why calling is so bad now. Who comes up with this nonsense?

    7. Josh says:

      The idea that people of different generation may think this annoys me, is much more annoying that anything depicted in the comic itself. I really have no issue with phone calls.

    8. brian1625 says:

      HA Though I am GEN X\Y And a voice mail? Voice mail gets transferred to text now ;) Why listen to it! You can do the opposite of this joke to a Baby Boomer! And calling is over used for basic communication. How about a text then meet up? IN PERSON *GASP

    9. Casey says:

      I used to tell my mom that my voicemail didn’t work, just to avoid the lengthy, but vague voicemails. I trained her well, she now sends me sms texts regularly and never expects a voicemail to be listened to, ever.

    10. Stranger says:

      Ok, can someone please explain to me what makes any of the above annoying? I can understand how a lengthy and vague voicemail might be a slight nuisance, but a phone call? I seriously want to understand.

      • Justin ST says:

        Yuppie problems.

      • Beasil says:

        As a member of the “generation Y”, what annoys me about phone calls is that they necessitate you dropping everything you’re doing right at that moment and then possibly having to let everyone in public listen to your half of the conversation. Doubly annoying if you have a cold, have lost your voice, have a speech impediment, or just don’t feel like exercising your vocal cords. Also, I have limited minutes for calls but unlimited texts. That’s the biggest thing.

      • Jim says:

        Stranger, put simply, Millennials prefer texts over phone calls because they are less interruptive. They’ve grown up during a period of unprecedented change to our modes of communication, and, being immersed in the Information Age, must negotiate an increasingly complex technological milieu. Asynchronous modes of communication like SMS, IM, and email provide a way to cope with this change by mitigating communication fatigue. Millennials are, by far, the most networked generation, so their avoidance of synchronous modes of communication, like phone calls and even in-person meetings, is understandable.

    11. Dancin Torso says:

      This is funny and not offensive.
      If some people understood how friendly and sweet the creator of Sticky Comics is, you wouldn’t be offended by hilarious sticky comics. I guess I’m a 1985 Milennial, and since I’m early in the generation, I have had BOTH perspectives in my lifetime. Older people are less likely to have text plans. They weren’t raised typing with thumbs and with touch-screens. Therefore they are less likely to text – they prefer phone calls. They may even still pay for dinosaur land-lines and if they own a cell phone they may usually have it “turned off,” (meaning it doesn’t notify you when you get a call or text). I texted my mom once when I was at the airport, and she tried to answer it! Texts and facebook posts can notify hundreds of friends in one moment, and they can all respond at their own convenience. Before I had a text plan, I used to think texts were annoying. Now that I’ve caught up with the times a bit, they are only efficient. Using phone calls to make plans or do business is ridiculous. Even for making social connections, a lot of my peers (especially adults younger than myself), find it difficult to invest the time in having vocal conversations. It is a strange phenomenon, and that’s why it’s funny in a sticky comic. The more you know :-D

    12. Ken says:

      I find the comment about “a lot of my peers (especially adults younger than myself), find it difficult to invest the time in having vocal conversations” rather disturbing – I guess because I’m a boomer. I challenge anyone to type words on their phone as fast as I can speak them, not even counting the fact that, in texting, complex vocal and facial emotions get simplified to cartoons… ;-)

      It seems that 40,000 years of evolution of interpersonal communication is being lost in one generation.

    13. Mary says:

      I am quite comfortable with all modes of communications – that must make me a genius – lol. I do believe the fact that people are now annoyed at using their voice is sad. They don’t have time to talk, and have no patience, voice conversations give them headaches – so what…the voice is now mute – :(

      Their spelling and grammar is gone, the voice is gone and since personality is now eliminated they are not able to stand out in anyway. I hope they type/text correctly – it’s all they have going for them and if the auto correct is on and they don’t catch it – they’re out. I text but expect to speak with them as well. If they can’t make an effort, I have no time for them (or job for them as all communication skills are required) For a generation which prides itself on social connections – they don’t have real social or communication skills at all which I see day after day and always wonder why I’m supposed to be impressed.

    14. Lisa says:

      I’m 28. I find this amusing and accurate – for *most* people with smartphones. :)

    15. jane says:

      I’m over 40, but still prefer text to voice, by a long shot. I have a hard time hearing if one party is on a cell phone, never mind both of us. It’s infuriating. I don’t use text-speak, ever, and prefer answering questions via text on my own time, not this NOW!NOW!NOW! crap that the phone makes me feel.

    16. BradyDale says:

      So on point. I can’t decide which side I fall on this. I think maybe I’m just annoyed by everything.

      On the one hand… a call when a quick text will do bugs me.

      And I hate the chit chat you have to do on phone calls. That’s frustrating.

      But the sense that every text should get a reply is frustrating, too. If a discussion takes more than like 3 texts, I pick up the phone. It’s more than I can deal with.

      A part of me misses talking to people on the phone but I also just don’t want to have to go thru the Hi-How-Are-You’s if it’s not necessary. I’m perplexed.

      Probably just a misanthrope.

    17. Ann P says:

      I’m gen-x and this would annoy ME! I didn’t like phones even when they were all they had. They were always a necessary evil as far as I was concerned.

    18. me says:

      When I communicate with my younger relations, they always want to Skype to explain things rather than use IM or mail, social networks, etc They’re pre-teen, though, so maybe that’ll change as the perceived social utility of those other services (and their literacy ;) ) increases. I’m not a millennial, but I agree with Stephen Fry that a telephone is like a small child that screams at you for attention at random times.

    19. abby says:

      while there are people who need to categorize or marginalize others to feel empowered, i think this is a benign poke at us and we just need to learn to laugh at ourselves more.

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